Ethical Case Studies

Environmental Sustainability – a video clip

 

Back ground to Business Ethics from the Small Biz Tookit

Examine one of these case studies and prepare a report:

Business principles in action – nutritional labelling – A Nestlé case study

Providing consumers with ethically sourced garments – A Primark case study

Ethical business practices – A Cadbury Schweppes case study

Business ethics and sustainability in the steel industry – A Tata Steel case study

Developing and implementing a strategic approach to ethics – A Vodafone case study

Business ethics and corporate social responsibility – An Anglo American case study

Coca Cola Myth Buster Ad withdrawn

Kerry Armstrong in the Coca-cola ad.

THE advertising industry has come under fire for failing to act on controversial claims that Coca-Cola does not make people fat or rot their teeth — claims the national consumer regulator has now ruled were “totally unacceptable”.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission yesterday ordered Coca-Cola to publish corrections in newspapers around the country over its “motherhood and myth-busting” campaign last year, which featured high-profile Australian actress Kerry Armstrong.

The ACCC found the advertisements had the potential to mislead consumers by suggesting Coca-Cola could not contribute to weight gain, obesity or tooth decay.

It also ruled misleading the claim that 250ml of Diet Coca-Cola contained half the amount of caffeine as that in the same sized cup of tea.

Late last year the industry-funded Advertising Standards Bureau dismissed similar complaints about the “myth-busting” campaign because, among other reasons, it did not promote “excessive consumption” and included extra detail about dental hygiene.

Health and dental groups applauded the ACCC’s crackdown on the Coca-Cola campaign, while consumer advocates said it highlighted the failure of the advertising industry to effectively regulate itself.

“It just really underlined that (advertisers) are out of line with community standards,” Choice spokesman Christopher Zinn said. “Advertisers are the people who are meant to keep their fingers on the pulse of society, but we would argue that in terms of junk food advertising they are just way out of step.”

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/national/mythbusting-coke-adverts-get-busted-20090402-9l5e.html#ixzz2v9D0v8DI

More Businesses Pursue Triple Bottom Line for a Sustainable Economy

Colleen Cordes | Apr 25, 2013 – World Watch – Vital Signs

 As corporations of all sizes increasingly choose to monitor and report on their social and environmental impacts, a growing number of mostly small and medium-sized companies are going even further: they are volunteering to be held publicly accountable to a new triple bottom line—prioritizing people and the planet as well as profits.

Just how broadly, rapidly, and rigorously this movement can spread is of critical importance, given the supersized global impacts of for-profit enterprises. Sustainable economies are likely to remain elusive without substantial shifts in corporate norms. Recent data provide signs that such change is possible and indeed may even have begun.

Over the last 15 years, for example, the number of businesses of all sizes that choose to self-assess how sustainable their operations are, using widely accepted social and environmental standards, and to publicly disclose their results has been growing rapidly, especially in Europe and Asia. (See Figure 1.)

Figure 1

LABOUR RIGHTS: BEHIND THE SEAMS

Understanding The Alliance and The Accord on Bangladesh worker safety

5 Dec 2013by Oxfam

Who has joined the accord for workers' safety in Bangladesh

Since April this year Oxfam has been asking Australian companies sourcing from Bangladesh to join the Bangladesh Fire and Building Safety Accord. The Accord is a legally binding initiative that mandates independent safety inspections (involving trade unions and local groups), the right for workers to be able refuse dangerous work.

https://www.oxfam.org.au/explore/workers-rights/oxfam-supports-workers-rights/

https://www.oxfam.org.au/2013/12/understanding-the-alliance-and-the-accord-on-bangladesh-worker-safety/

Stitching up child workers

http://media.smh.com.au/news/world-news/footballs-secret-shame-3655658.html

Football’s secret shame

The Sherrin and Canterbury footballs that Australian children punt, pass and catch in weekend games are stitched by India’s poorest children in appalling, dangerous and illegal conditions.

Samvari barely looks up: her lean, lithe fingers don’t stop working for a second. Using her thumbs, she pushes the two heavy needles through the PVC panels gripped tightly between her knees. With a sharp tug, she pulls the waxed string through hard, as far as her arms will extend.

At her feet sits a handful of half-finished footballs – destined for Australia – and a loose pile of leather ellipses: her day’s progress and the work still in front of her. ”She likes to help stitch balls,” her mother Madhubala explains nervously. She is fearful of trouble for having her daughter work. ”She’s only been stitching a few months.”

Samvari’s well-practised movements suggest otherwise. Samvari is 10. Indian law says she must go to school. ”But she doesn’t like it there, she cries and runs away and comes home,” Madhubala says. Besides, she explains, ”our family is poor, we need this money to live, to eat”.

Laxmi (mother in green sari holding baby) Sunali in blue and white dress, stitching Sherrins). Sunali, 11 and her sister Rupa, 10, stitch Sherrin Auskick balls while their mother, Laxmi, cares for their infant sister. Sunali doesn't go to school anymore, instead she stitches six days a week. She is paid seven Rupees, about 12 cents, for every ball she completes. Photo: Ben DohertyClick for more photos

Aussie icon made in India

Laxmi (mother in green sari holding baby) Sunali in blue and white dress, stitching Sherrins). Sunali, 11 and her sister Rupa, 10, stitch Sherrin Auskick balls while their mother, Laxmi, cares for their infant sister. Sunali doesn’t go to school anymore, instead she stitches six days a week. She is paid seven Rupees, about 12 cents, for every ball she completes. Photo: Ben Doherty

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/national/stitching-up-child-workers-20120921-26c86.html#ixzz2ndRjAyhy